© 2019 by South Titan Basketball

Teaching Progression

 

Teaching “motion” might be one of the greatest coaching challenges in basketball, but most rewarding. We have often shared with our players it is a lot like reading. I honestly do not know the point in time when I learned to read, but I do remember the learning process. Learning “motion” is a similar process. As a coach and/or player you will need time and patience, but eventually over time (S=E/T) it will become a “who we are”. Motion basketball is the hardest to guard and most enjoyable style of play known to basketball purists everywhere. The teaching progression can be divided into three levels: cutting, screening and dribble drive.

 

Level 1 | Cutting Game

If the basket cut is our choice movement after passing to a wing, then it stands to reason our ability to cut (move people) without the ball is level 1. Hard to guard teams do this with the acronym “SAM” in mind:

  • Spacing—Spacing is offense and offense is spacing.

  • Angles—Move at angles (do not round off your cuts, create proper passing angles).

  • Momentum—Change of speed is vital (go in slow and come out fast).

In addition to the basket cut, we also emphasize the ability to fill with the following: V-cut, L-cut, blast cut and back cut. For additional information see Individual Moves.

 

Level 2 | Screening Game

Good defenders will often take away the basket cut, therefore, good offensive players counter and become great screeners.  We believe the most open man is basketball is the screener and encourage the following:

  • Down or Away Screen

  • Flare Screen

  • Back Screen

  • Pin Down and Wide Pin Down

  • Cross Screen

Certain players on the floor cannot screen enough, others not so much. However, we want quality over quantity!

 

Level 3 | Dibble Drive Game

We want to drive the ball as opposed to merely dribbling it. No standing dribbles! All players must realize the importance of this concept: when to dribble, driving close-outs, and where to space and drift to without the ball. Dribble penetration is a very common occurrence in basketball, but possibly the most difficult concept to understand (hence being the third level in the progression). Our drive of preference is from the forward spot (wing) to the middle. This requires the following movements and spots to be filled:

  • Low post (if occupied) L-cuts (steps out).

  • Ball side guard cracks-back (one man and half behind the line of the ball).

  • Weak side guard spaces and drifts away from the dribble (outside the arc).

  • Weak side forward back cuts or drifts to the dead corner (if post is present).

 

If penetration occurs from the forward spot (wing) to the baseline, the following movements and spots are to be filled:

  • Low post (on either side) I-cuts.

  • Ball side guard cracks-back (one man and half behind the line of the ball).

  • Weak side guard fills diagonal.

  • Weak side forward drifts to the dead corner.

 

Another possible point of penetration is from the top (aka “slot”). If the ball side guard drives the adjacent elbow and gets to the rim the following movements and spots to be filled:

  • Low post (opposite side) cleans up. (Get ready! If his man helps up he will be open for an easy basket).

  • Weak side guard cracks-back (one man and half behind the line of the ball).

  • Ball side forward drifts to the dead corner.

  • Weak side forward stays home (diagonal).

 

If the ball side guard drives the opposite elbow, the following movements and spots are to be filled:

  • Low post relocates to the opposite landmark (Clean up position).

  • Weak side guard cracks-back (one man and half behind the line of the ball).

  • Ball side forward stays home (diagonal).

  • Weak side forward drifts to the dead corner.